2023
23
Aug

Dominant COVID Narratives and Implications for Information Literacy Education in the “Post-Pandemic” United States

In Brief Over the past three+ years that COVID-19 has changed everyday life across the globe, people around the world have been tasked with making sense of new, evolving, and often conflicting information, including public messaging that is frequently confusing and shaped by political agendas and interests. Conflicting narratives about the COVID-19 pandemic, including dominant...
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2023
15
Mar

Compounded Labor: Developing OER as a Marginalized Creator

From the lens of a new Online Educational Resources (OER) Librarian embarking on an OER initiative at an R1 university I reflect on creating and implementing an English OER textbook and curriculum at a community college. To add my voice to the literature on OER creation, I use an autoethnographic method of writing and research. Autoethnography makes use of personal experience to describe, analyze, and interpret cultural works and experiences.  I discuss how my personal and professional experience influences my approach to supporting OER creators, and I reflect on my experience as an OER creator from the intersection of being both Latinx and a working class woman working at a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) situated in a majority-minority state in the United States. This paper acknowledges the invisible labor embedded within OER creation and suggests ways to support historically marginalized creators. It also includes recommendations for program-level changes that can be made to support OER creators. 
2023
1
Mar

A Genealogy of Open

by Betsy Yoon Abstract/In Brief The term open has become a familiar part of library and education practice and discourse, with open source software being a common referent. However, the conditions surrounding the emergence of the open source movement are not well understood within librarianship. After identifying capitalism and neoliberalism as structures that shape library...
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2022
10
Aug
and

Dispelling the Myth of Library Anxiety and Embracing Academic Discomfort

By Kelleen Maluski and Symphony Bruce In Brief Countless articles, essays, studies, and conference presentations have been devoted to library anxiety and defining, analyzing, and reviewing behaviors of our users that are seen as “abnormal” or “counterintuitive” to using our services. However, there is not much critique of library anxiety as a concept and it...
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2022
1
Jun
, and

The old and the prudish: an examination of sex, sexuality, and queerness in Library of Congress Classification

By Tiffany Henry, Rhonda Kauffman, and Anastasia Chiu In Brief Despite the fact that scholarship and knowledge about sex and sexuality have grown enormously in the last century, these topics in the Library of Congress Classification (LCC) schedules have remained stagnant, particularly in the HQ schedule (a classification subclass), entitled “The Family. Marriage. Women.” In...
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2022
18
May
and

A Practitioner’s Guide to Serious Play in the Library

By Reid Boehm and Taylor Davis-Van Atta In brief For academic libraries, making investments that strengthen and integrate research and development (R&D) capacity may also disrupt long-established norms and structures both within the library and across an institution. This article analyzes the authors’ experiences as well as the existing literature in order to highlight cultural...
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2022
20
Apr
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Working Towards Tenure Together: Creating an Intersectional Peer Supported Cohort Model

By Halle Burns, Mayra Corn, Jennifer Culley, Stephanie Fell, Sarah Jones, Christina Miskey, Ruby Nugent, Rebecca Orozco, Brittani Sterling, & Aidy Weeks1 In Brief After observing the realities of the tenure-track process at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), a number of newly hired faculty librarians created an informal ongoing, peer-to-peer support network. This...
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