2017
Dec
13
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Editorial: Harassment in Scholarship is Unacceptable–and Requires Action

Something is rotten in the state of online scholarship. We here at Lead Pipe have noticed a significant uptick in commenting and other behaviors across multiple social platforms that constitute harassment—comments, subtweets, and actions meant to intimidate, cause anxiety in, personally discredit, and silence scholars who share their research and arguments through publication and in...
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2017
Nov
29

Accessibility for Justice: Accessibility as a Tool for Promoting Justice in Librarianship

In Brief Recent critiques of diversity in higher education and librarianship by Stewart (2017), Hudson (2017), and Hathcock (2015) have encouraged a critical shift away from diversity talk and initiatives, towards attention to equity, anti-racism, and whiteness. They point out that diversity initiatives often fail to address deeper power imbalances, and they offer new language...
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2017
Nov
01

Socratic Questioning: A Teaching Philosophy for the Student Research Consultation

In Brief Socratic questioning, the act of asking questions in order to prompt critical thinking and reflection, expands the boundaries of librarianship by borrowing from the fields of philosophy, pedagogy, and psychology. When employed during the research consultation, Socratic questioning establishes a cooperative relationship between librarian and student that empowers the student to take agency...
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2017
Oct
18

The Innovation Fetish and Slow Librarianship: What Librarians Can Learn From the Juicero

In Brief This essay reflects on the effects of capitalism and corporatization on the work habits of librarians, and critiques the profession’s emphasis on innovation for its own sake. First, the essay compares Juicero Inc., a Silicon Valley startup that faced criticism for producing an expensive machine that squeezed premade packets of juice, to projects...
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2017
Oct
04

Modular Short Form Videos for Library Instruction

In Brief Expensive software isn’t necessary to create effective tutorials. Quick, unedited tutorials created on social media, such as on Instagram or Snapchat, may be more effective. These short form videos (SFVs) combine the advantages of animated GIFs with the advantages of screencasts: modularity, repetition of steps, and animated visuals supported by pertinent audio. SFVs...
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2017
Sep
20
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Creating Connections: How Libraries Can Use Exhibits to Welcome New Students

In Brief:  Feelings of loneliness are common among first-year college students during the start of the academic year. Academic and social integration into the campus community—both factors that can positively affect student retention—are critical yet difficult for any one group to manage. Grand Valley State University Libraries expanded its reach to help foster student engagement...
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2017
Sep
06

From AASL Standards to the ACRL Framework: Higher Education Shifts in Pedagogical Strategies

In Brief How does the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education function in relation to the information literacy standards used with students in K-12 schools and how does it inform academic librarians’ pedagogical strategies? While these documents are strongly related, there are large differences in their theoretical approach to information literacy, which are revealed...
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2017
Aug
23
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Finding foundations: A model for information literacy assessment of first-year students

In Brief This article presents a case study in establishing an information literacy instruction and assessment program for first-year university students at the University of Colorado Denver. Rather than presenting assessment data, we document the process in which our department engaged with the student learning assessment cycle, with the intention of allowing other information literacy...
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2017
Aug
09
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We Used Problem-Based Learning in Library Instruction and Came to Question Its Treatment of Students

In Brief: Two instruction librarians at a medium-sized liberal-arts college on the East Coast of the United States replaced their lecture-style teaching with Problem-Based Learning (PBL). They collaborated with two English instructors to bring PBL to a two-session sequence of library instruction. However, the more they used PBL, and the more they read about how...
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